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Sunday, 29 March 2009

Fine Art Painting , Tetrad Colors and Movement, "Bananas, Tomatoes and Limes"


Bananas, Tomatoes and Limes
Original Fine Art Painting
Acrylic on wrapped canvas on wood stretcher bars
8 by 10 by 0.75 inches, 20.4 by 25.5 by 1.9 cm

I painted this still life again using a tetrad colour scheme. My 2 sets of complements were orange and blue, and yellow and violet. I liked the circular and diagonal movement created by the objects and bowl.


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Thursday, 26 March 2009

Art and the Element, Line

Line is an element of art. Lines can be straight or they can curve. Lines can be thin, thick or tapered from thick to thin helping the line move through space. Lines can be cross contour lines, i.e. around the width of an arm. This helps create volume. Lines can be directional, i.e. down the arm. This helps create movement. A diagonal line can create movement and action. A vertical line can create strength and power. The horizontal line can create calm. Think of a line that goes around the shape or outside of an arm; this is a contour line. If you draw several lines close together you can create a dark space, i.e. the shadow on an arm. This is called hatching. If you want to make an area even darker you can cross the hatch lines with lines, called cross hatching. There is a good deal more information about lines.

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Friday, 20 March 2009

Fine Art Painting , Tetrad Colors and Active Image, "Apples and Pot"



Apples and Pot
Acrylic on wrapped canvas on wood stretcher bars
8 by 10 by 0.75 inches, 20.4 by 25.5 by 1.9 cm

I painted this still life using a tetrad colour scheme. My 2 sets of complements were orange and blue, and red and green. I also made this still life more active by using brush stokes and a triangular structure. The eyes enter from the left side and soar upward to the right side.

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Wednesday, 11 March 2009

Art and Focal Points

Most art has one focal point that attracts your eyes. I am working on a still life painting that has apples and an old bowl. What attracted me to the subject was the ancient handle on the bowl; this will be my focal point. Artists from other eras would use the Golden Rule, a mathematical formula, to help place focal points. Today’s artists have generally moved away from this mathematical formula. I use a “tic tac toe” method. Think of the 4 lines used in tic tac toe on the canvas (support). I place my focal point on or close to a section where the vertical and horizontal lines cross (4 points). The artist tries to show entry or movement from each canvas edge (not corners) to the focal point. The distances between the focal point and the 4 canvas’ edges should vary. In the focal point, artists place the most detail and contrast. The focal area usually has the darkest dark and lightest light colors. It usually has the brightest color and hardest edges. Lines and shapes direct you to the focal point. While the focal point does not have to be on the right side of the canvas, many artists place the focal point on the right side. I mentioned in an earlier article that since most people read from left to right, your eyes usually enter a painting from the left and move toward the right. Artists vary from these rules. The next time you see a painting, squint your eyes. It is easier to see the lightest and darkest colors when you squint. Stop squinting and look at the painting; what attracts your eyes first? Where was your attraction area? Is it a focal point? If not why do you think the artist placed the focal point in another location?

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Saturday, 7 March 2009

Structure, Original Fine Art Painting - "Pears, Flower and Bowl"

Pears, Flower and Bowl
Acrylic on wrapped canvas on wood stretcher bars
8 by 10 by 0.75 inches, 20.4 by 25.5 by 1.9 cm


I wanted to paint this still life from an overhead view. I was interested in the diagonal structure of the pears that contrast with the circular structure of the bowl. I was also interested in the pattern of light.


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Wednesday, 4 March 2009

Simultaneous Contrast and Complements

I have referred to the theory of simultaneous contrast in earlier blogs. Simultaneous contrast means that when 2 different components such as hues are in contact, each hue enhances the other. I mentioned this when discussing complementary colours on the colour wheel. Orange and blue hues are a complementary pair; they are opposite each other on the colour wheel. Therefore when orange is beside blue on your painting both colours are enhanced.

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